Last September The Guardian reported about Omar Khadr:

Omar Khadr has grown from boy to man at Guantánamo Bay. In 2002 the 15-year-old Khadr, a Canadian, was captured by US forces during a firefight in Afghanistan and taken first to Bagram airbase and then to Guantánamo, where he eventually pleaded guilty to throwing a grenade that killed a US soldier. A decade on, Khadr – the only child solder to be prosecuted in a military commission for war crimes – remains in the detention centre while his lawyers press the Canadian government to honour its promise to bring him home.

Canada has come under fire for its apparent use of delaying tactics to keep Khadr, the last western citizen left at Guantánamo, locked up in a facility where he has been abused and his rights violated.

He was transported to Canada where he has to fulfill the remainder of his sentence. His eligible for parole this year. Dutch showed a documentary (English, Dutch subtitles) about this youngest prisoner of Guantanamo Bay:

See also Free Omar Khadr.

Also read the story of Samir Naji al Hasan Moqbel in the New York Times: Hunger striking at Guantanomo Bay – Gitmo is killing me:

I will never forget the first time they passed the feeding tube up my nose. I can’t describe how painful it is to be force-fed this way. As it was thrust in, it made me feel like throwing up. I wanted to vomit, but I couldn’t. There was agony in my chest, throat and stomach. I had never experienced such pain before. I would not wish this cruel punishment upon anyone.

I am still being force-fed. Two times a day they tie me to a chair in my cell. My arms, legs and head are strapped down. I never know when they will come. Sometimes they come during the night, as late as 11 p.m., when I’m sleeping.

There are so many of us on hunger strike now that there aren’t enough qualified medical staff members to carry out the force-feedings; nothing is happening at regular intervals. They are feeding people around the clock just to keep up.